About your Search

20121001
20121031
SHOW
Journal 33
Book TV 16
( more )
STATION
CSPAN 106
CNN 92
CNNW 92
FOXNEWS 92
CSPAN2 82
WHUT (Howard University Television) 67
MSNBC 63
MSNBCW 63
FBC 61
KQED (PBS) 47
WETA 46
CNBC 38
WRC (NBC) 36
CURRENT 32
WMPT (PBS) 31
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1361
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,395 (some duplicates have been removed)
the death of over 30,000 people. politic analyst that they heritage foundation examined russia's role in the conflict and the support of this regime. this is an hour and a half. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our claman opportune -- auditorium on our heritage.org web site as well as joining us via c-span today and in the future. we would ask everyone in houston make sure your cell phones have been turned off this week prepare for everyone's benefit in recording of today's program. we will post the program in 24 hours on our heritage web site or everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today is.there steven bucci with the homeland security in our douglas and sarah allison center for foreign-policy studies. is focuses cybersecurity as well as defense support to civil authorities. dr. bucci served in america for three decades as an army special forces officer and top pentagon official and commanded the third battalion special forces and became military assistant to defense secretary donald rumsfeld in july 2001 and served through
syria during the crisis. leo of the cost to russia on the syrian policy which i believe is quite large. try to explain why russia perseveres and seems tothe russp goes back a long way. syria became independent from france, scout established an embassy in damascus and became a major center of soviet diplomatic activity and was the center. for negotiation between the zionist movement and the soviet union leading up to the soviet support of the establishment of the state of israel in 1948. following the death of stalin and a series of coups in domestic, syria became a purchaser of soviet arms and at the time, some fear that syria was going communist. the united arab republic defeated those fears but it was called -- called a leader a heady and men for doing it. when it broke up in 1961, moscow courted damascus and a following the left-wing coup, relationships became quite close and you will recall the soviet efforts to preserve the narrowly-based assets pterygium called for an end to the war. relations grew closer in 1970. syria granted russia enabled installation, supply and mainte
between the u.s., russia and syria. a pal discuss the syrian support of the -- a panel discusses russian support of the syrian civil war. this is about an hour and a half. >> we welcome all of you joining us on heritage foundation and on c-span. we ask that you turn off yourself funds as we begin recording for the benefit of today's program. the we will post for everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today is dr. steven bucci. his focus is special operations and cyber security. he commanded the third battalion fifth special forces and also became the military assistant to donald rumsfeld. at his retirement, -- prior to joining us, he was a leading consultant on cyber security. please welcome the in -- join me in welcoming steven bucci. [applause] >> we have a very timely subjects to discuss, and i think we have a great panel of experts that will be doing be discussing to get us started. i have been interested in this because one of the first things i did was testified before congress about the weapons of mass destruction threat that syria and the somewhat untimely demise mig
europe on the one hand and the heartland of europe towards russia on the other. it was always problematic which way it would go and how it would develop. i came across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin wall and i've been back-and-forth and it occurred to me after reading this book the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one german history that germany would reinvent itself in different territory always so today we have a united germany that trades with poland had a rapprochement with germany and they've had the baltic states where they would keep russia it out and the germans down and now they are triumphant economically. they may not that berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them. so the question of rises and this gets back to geography with russia still meeting buffer zones in eastern europe. the collapse didn't end russia's in security. the lithuanians and french throughout history as a regional power flush with natural gas, a rich and wealthy germany but the polling that we now know has a significant storage of natural shale
foundation examined russia's role in the conflict and their support of the assad regime. the turkish military recently confiscated russian arms down to board a ceramic commercial airliner. this is an hour and a half. >> we of course welcome those who showed us on all of these occasions, on our heritage.org website as well as those joining us via c-span today and in the future. we would ask of an in-house to make sure your cell phones have been turned off as they prepare to begin for everyone's benefit in the recording of today's program. we will oppose the programs in 24 hours on a heritage website for everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today stuck to her stephen bucci, senior research fellow for direct, security and allison center for foreign policy studies. his focus of special operations in cybersecurity bacillus defense support to to civil authorities. dr. bucci served america with three decades as a special third-best time in special forces. he also became military assistance to defense secretary donald rumsfeld and served throughout secretaries turned. at his retirement
for a discussion on russia's role in the syrian civil war. this is just getting started. >> minute or two to do a short wrap-up. i will tell you for those of you who have not been to panels that i have moderated before, when you ask a question, if you get past the second piece of english language and i don't hear a question mark, i'm going to stop you. so this is not a time for the audience to give speeches. we have four experts up here to give those. so to make sure we get as many questions asked and answered as possible, just try and keep your questions suck sinlt, get to the question part, and we'll let the experts address them. but now we're ready to start. i'm going to do all the introo ductions right away, and then we'll just go down the line. the speakers are sitting in the order which they will present. we're going to start with dr. jim phillips who's a senior research fellow for middle eastern affairs here at the heritage foundation. he has written extensively about the middle east and international terrorism since 1978. he's a member of the board of editors of middle east quarterly, a
in russia, here he is performing tchaikovsky's fourth symphony with the orchestra. >> rose: he is in new york to lead the world orchestra for peace in tribute to the late george schultz at carnegie hall and also conduct the london symphony orchestra in a series of concerts devoted to brams, i am pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> thank you so much. >> rose: how did you come to take over this orchestra? >> it is an ensemble of absolute first class musician whose present good 40 or 50 countries, and these are countries in latin america, of course, north america, many, many from europe and quite many from asia, of course russia is there, also part of territory of soviet union, and i think it makes a very good statement every time for peace, for understanding between cultures, between nations, differe religious, different historical background,. >> rose: how well did you know shulte. >> i didn't know him well i met him for the first time in moscow, 1990, the chicago orchestra was magnificent, two or three concerts in moscow, i attended two at least i attended myself and then
suggestions for them as to how they can get china and russia on board? >> some months ago an international so-called action group had a meeting in geneva. >> rose: right. >> that group also included russia. >> rose: right. >> from that meeting, a communique was issued that clearly stated that a transition process should be initiated in syria. towards democracy. >> rose: without condition? in other words, nothing has to happen because, as you know, the rebels are demanding assad has to leave. >> yeah. >> rose: and they're not willing apparently, to have much political conversations until that happens. >> yeah, but my point is that for the first time an international gathering agreed on a process, an international meeting including russia agreed on a process leading to a transition in syria. my point is that could serve as the basis for an international response through the u.n. security council. you asked me what could i recommend. >> rose: right, right. >> that's what i could recommend. and, of course, if the parties involved did not comply with that binding resolution, it should have some co
and military supplies for the syrian army. >> syria has condemned the act as air piracy. russia accused turkey of endangering the lives of the passengers on the plane. >> the story has been dominated newspaper headlines in turkey. ankara says it had information the aircraft was carrying military equipment and that it had no alternative but to force the plane to land. the incident has further increased tensions between damascus and ankara, but the turkish prime minister is unapologetic, saying if the plan -- the plane had not been intercepted, the cargo would have reached syria's defense ministry. moscow has accused turkey of endangering the lives of the russian citizens who were passengers on the plane. syria has also condemned turkey's actions. >> what happened could be described as piracy. turkish air piracy against a civilian syrian plane on a regular flight from moscow to damascus. >> these suspicious cargo was confiscated. after several hours, the plane was allowed to finish its journey to damascus. ankara has now told turkish airlines not to fly planes through syrian airspace, saying it
in serving their prison terms in the capital. staying in russia, rosneft has tightened its grip on the oil industry with the deal to purchase tnk-bp. they would be a 20% controlled -- stakeholder. >> rosneft is the top countries -- the top oil company in russia. the deal is still subject to approval by the russian government. president vladimir putin is already voicing his support, giving a very strong indication that it will go ahead. >> bp ben is -- bp is spending #13.1 billion -- 13.1 billion euros. the remaining shareholders have sold their stake to rosneft, reading a new oil giant controlled by the kremlin. russian president vladimir putin has given his blessing to the deal, saying it sent the right signal to markets. "this is a good, large deal that is necessary not only for the russian energy sector, but also for the entire russian economy." but the british company is also hoping to extend its influence within russia, with bp receiving rosneft shares alongside cash in the deal. it will have a chance to be more active in russia. russia is consolidating its position as a global energy
battling cancer. a form erica made yan naval intelligence officer has pleaded guilty for spying for russia. he admitted to selling sensitive intelligence for ameer $3,000 a month. he said he spied for idea logical reasons, not for money. syrian's former ministry has accused turkey of hostile action after a syrian passenger plan from moscow to damascus was forced to land in turkey. turkey said it con fist kated illegal cargo. it wants all the items returned intact. russia is also demanding an explanation. >> in the darkness of the airport, the turkish authorities began their examination of the syrian passenger plane. it had been interpreted by turkish fighter jets and forced to land as it crossed turkish air space. there were around 30 passengers onboard the air bus 8320. turkey's foreign minister had said the aircraft had been carrying illegal cargo. he said materials have been confiscated. we will keep the materials in turkey to be examined. some some evidence is in question because there are some that needed to be declared but weren't. the syrian air jet was on a scheduled flight from mo
is called, "mitt romney's bain made millions on big tobacco in u.s., russia." "walmart strikes spread to more states." >> yesterday when walmart store workers and multiple stores walked off the job, that was the first time, the second time in five days and the second time in 50 years of walmart that we've seen multiple u.s. store workers going on strike together. it signifies we're in a new wave in this multi-decade struggle between u.s. labor and the world's largest private employer. it is a wave that started in many ways the summer in june when we saw eight workers go out on strike at a walmart supplier. it continued last month when workers in walmart's supply chain, who get squeezed by the budget even though on paper the work for a contractor, went on strike in california and then in illinois and then escalated last week and again yesterday with a combined 150 walmart store workers taking this action. >> i would like to bring mike compton into the conversation. you are a walmart employee. at the moment, your in bentonville, arkansas. can you explain what it is you are intending to
russia and turkey has erupted over the grounding of a plane in turkish airspace. margaret warner reports. >> warner: turkish military jets forced the syrian passenger plane to land last night at ankara, after it entered turkish airspace enroute from moscow to damascus today, turkish prime minister recep tayyip erdogan said his government, acting on a tip, had found the plane was carrying russian-made munitions and military gear to aid the assad regime, in the syrian civil war. >> this was equipment and ammunition that was being sent from a russian agency to the syrian defense ministry. this equipment is now being examined by relevant units. under no circumstances, can this and something like this happening on a passenger plane is a violation of international flights. >> warner: russian authorities had disputed earlier reports that military equipment was on board the plane. and moscow accused the turks of endangering the roughly 30 crew and passengers, many of them russian. the plane was allowed to fly on to damascus without the disputed cargo. but the syrian transport minister condemned
lukashenko is assessed with the idea of having his own nuclear plant. it is also in russia's interest to build it as soon as possible. >> the world has been turning away from nuclear energy. clients for russia's nuclear exports are dwindling. our leaders -- our leader's manic desire to own a nuclear plant makes us an ideal match. we are a testing site for a reactor that has never been built anywhere else. >> the next day, we manage to get a meeting at the construction site. two reactors are to be built here with the combined capacity of 2,400 megawatts. the pit is finished, and concrete is already being poured, but environmental activists say there is not even a final blueprint yet. the plant spokesman says the work so far is just preparatory and that nothing will be built without a blueprint. but he does confirm that there is, as of yet, no model of the reactor. critics, he says, are everywhere. >> some organizations are starting to actively resist the power plant. they want to put forward their views and say they represent popular opinion, but they are not succeeding. they are not s
's is encouraging you to smoke cigarettes especially if you lived in russia turns out mitt romney and bain and company. zack carter joins us from the huffing to know post. he did the investigation. zack tell me what bain company did when mitt romney was running it in this reward? >> so this is bain and company the consulting firm that sort of gives advice to other big corporations, if it doesn't take them over and loot them for all they're worth and lay off all the employees the big critique with bain capitol. mitt started rung bain and co. one of the first clients was phillip morris. they quickly moved into the russian market, post soviet phase where all the big factories are being privatized and going into the economy. bain under romney gets a contract with the united states government a $3.9 million contract to go be and advicer in russia. they think that the russian economy could handle a 33% larger load of smoking than it's currently happening, because the soviet economy is not good at marketing. they start advicing big tobacco companies on how to take over those newly privatized asse
came out and he was trying to nail president on confusing al-qaeda and russia. nail him on the fact that romney said russia is our biggest threat. romney turned it around i thought answered it just masterfully. take a listen. >> russia, i indicated is a geo political foe. not -- excuse me. geopolitical foe. in the same paragraph i said iran is the greatest national security threat we face. russia does continue to battle us in the u.n. time and time again. i have clear eyes on this. i'm not going to wear rose-colored glasses when it comes to russia or mr. putin. i'm certainly not going to say i'll give you more flexibility after the election. >> andrea: i thought that it was a very naive attempt by the president to score political point it. he confused that russia is geopolitical foe. we battle them at the u.n. and the other is a terror organization. the fact that the president tried to lump it in and hit it on that, he missed the mark. romney was able to make the distinction and look shrewd. >> bob: the fact that romney would suggest iran is biggest-threat and doesn't make china, wh
has also been very critical of president obama for not taking a tougher stance on russia and a lot of its anti-american policies, specifically its support for syrian president as sued. -- assad. do you believv president obama will come out with a tougher stance on russia? >> well, i would be interested in asking the other side what do they propose we do with regard to russia? how do we penalize them for saying things and doing things we don't like? i think you're relationship with russia is pretty obvious one at this point. they see it in their best interest to cooperate with us they will do so. when we see it in our best interest to cooperate with them we will do so. when we disagree we'll have some conflict. president putin is not as popular within russia as he once was is using the united states and the west in general to try and deflect dissatisfaction internally with regard to the state of the russian economy. i think some of that will be bound to continue. we'll have to have a forthright honest relationship with russia. when we think they're wrong we'll say so. syria is perfe
with unhappy employees. mark zuckerberg is attempting to make new inroads for facebook in russia. the facebook founder met with russia's prime minister, dmitry medvedev, to talk about expanding the social media network's presence there. russia is one of few countries where facebook isn't a major player. reportedly, russia is the largest internet market in europe. in case you are wondering, zuckerberg lost his hoodie and wore a formal suit to the meeting. kraft has officially split into two. kraft and its snack food spinoff, modelez international, filed to trade as two separate public companies on tuesday. the north american grocery business will continue to carry the name kraft and include velveeta and miracle whip. tickers will change to "krft" from "kft." mondelez, which includes oreo and cadbury, will trade under mdlz. according to analysts, the split is more evidence that the ipo market is getting stronger. retailers are prepping for happy holidays. the national retail federation is expecting a bump in holiday shopping. the group predicts americans will spend 4.1%, not quite as high as l
to the billionaire opposition leader. does this need a tilt by and for russia? the search for survivors in hong kong in a collision between a boat and a ferry continues. midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, 1:00 in the afternoon in vatican city, where pope benedict has returned from holiday to find his former employee on trial, which could lift the lid of the inner and secretive world of the back -- vatican. a controversial book largely based on the documents that were stolen claims that there were power struggles, defamation campaigns, and allegations of corruption at the highest levels of the church. allen, in a sense this case is as much about the catholic church and what goes on inside of it as it is about the fate of this man. >> certainly, this is one of the world's more secretive institutions and has been made desperately uncomfortable with this whole process. remember, earlier this year for weeks on end it found details of its inner workings being strewn across the italian media. the man charged with having been responsible for handling those documents to journalists is none other than
limited with russia limited the number of nuclear weapons. i recently spoke with the chief of staff, and asked him what looming automatic budget cuts would mean for the nuclear enterprise. >> well the nuclear enterprise is the perfection is standard. we look very hard at any serious cut that would jeopardize nuclear assurety. it does loom. it is equivalent to a meat axe. it is not a surgical strike of our dollars, and it has a serious effect. we cannot afford that kind of a cut in our nuclear enterprise. we're in the midst of modernizing our weapons systems we have made great strides to strangen our ability. our airmen are performing well, everything is on the table in this budget year, just as it was last year, so we will look critically at any cut. >> would there have to be some relief do you think, to allow you guys to continue that kind of work? would there have to be a dispension? >> that's a great question, vago. these are the nations weapons. we present these forces to the commander who deployed them for the president. because they're national weapons, i believe they do deser
>>> this morning on "early today" -- >>> russia indicated is a geopolitical foe. >> the 1980s are calling in their foreign policy bank. >> who won, who lost and did the final debate help undecided voters decide? >>> bill and hillary clinton visit haiti together to assess progress. they'll reveal a deeply personal claim. >>> and the most affordable cities to live in the united states. cities to live in the united states. is yours one of them? captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. i'm lynn berry. after the third debate between president obama and republican nominee mitt romney, there are just 14 days left before american voters choose their next president. according to a cbs news instant polls on uncommitted voters, president obama was a clear two to one victor with 53% saying he won. governor romney got 23%. 24% called it a tie. a cnn orc national poll called it closer with 48% saying obama won while 40% picked obama. for more we go to nbc's steve handlesman who's in florida for us. steve, good morning. >> reporter: hi, lynn. thanks. good morning from
about asia, a lot about russia. this is really going to be focused on syria, iran, libya and afghanistan. is it not? >> yeah, i think you're exactly right. going to focus on the middle east and northern africa, libya specifically. mitt romney as you noted, will accuse the president of saying that simple language, that hope is not a strategy. trying to -- harry truman and reagan. this speech is almost dedicated to george marshall. we're here at the hall of valor. it is in the battleground state of virginia that's so critical right now. there will be some familiar themes that we expect to hear from mitt romney in the speech. he'll be speaking about the need to avert defense cuts. that affects tens of thousands of people potentially here in virginia. he'll focus on the need to reinvest in the military and also to strengthen our relationships with allies overseas. as you noted, there's not a great difference in terms of the actual policies as best we've understood them. one point he will make is on syria. his public position is a little more activist. he'll say among other things, in syria,
this around and lead. >>neil: thank you very much, governor. >> ripping over russia. >> a few months ago you asked, what is the biggest geopolitical threat facing america and you said russia. not al qaeda, but russia. in the 1980's, now, are asking for their foreign policy bet because the cold war has been over for on years. >>guest: i will not wear rose colored we glasses with russia or putin and i will not say i will give you more flexibility after the election. after the election he will get more backbone. >>neil: all right, k.t. joins us and says the governor has it right. >>guest: the second debate made everyone woman angry sounding like two squabbling boys. we wanted them to go work it out. many had a different reaction. you like thinginge arguing. i like that mitt romney did not swing, and not take bait. who was he talking to? suburb an women. those are the people. >>neil: i can understand not taking a swings but something? dance? weave? >>guest: romney had to do three things. >>neil: did he explain russia? >>guest: he didn't take it. >>neil: what do you think of russia? everyone lead
literary classics of 19th century russia which one of the first trained experts in the american foreign service was able to read in the original, his russian was better than that of many russians themselves, they wiewld often say. he used his time as a young man training in the foreign service to study the culture of 19th century russia, to study through the literature of 19th century and very early pre-revolutionary pre-20th century russia and draw certain conclusions about russian national character, russian culture from that. who were the authors that he read? well, they are the obvious suspects. certainly, -- someone else who was most influential, who you might have thought least probable in russian literary heros, and this is chekov. it's very interesting when george kennan gave the first academic lecture at an american university, this is in october of 1946, he's invited to yale. i'm happy to say, to speak, but he spends about a third of his time very much to the puzzlement of his hosts talking not about the cold war or the soviet union or containment, but about chekov. why would
rose colored glasses when it comes to russia or mr. putin. >> from from red glasses to red ink, did mitt romney gaughan any red states? or did president obama zing his way to a win? >> so the question is not a game of battleship. >> we go to the scorecards on a special "early start. >>> good morning. welcome to "early start," everyone. >> it's 5:00 a.m. in the east. >> the debates are done. no more debates. president obama and mitt romney going toe to toe over america's role on the world stage. >> and by most accounts, it was a more forceful president obama who came out on top last night. the majority of analysts and voters agreeing mitt romney was on the defensive for much of this foreign policy face-off. a cnn poll of people who watched this third and final debate shows 48% favored obama with 40% for romney. the president now two for three in the showdowns in the polling. he also won the second debate by seven points after taking a 42-point beating in debate number one. senior congressional correspondent dana bash live from boca raton, florida. the million dollar question is how m
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,395 (some duplicates have been removed)